0+
TRUSTED CLIENTS

109000

LEGAL SEPARATION CASES
0%
SUCCESSFUL CASES

10,6000

ANNULMENT CASES

Understanding Marriage Annulment

Definition of Marriage Annulment

Marriage annulment is a legal procedure that declares a marriage null and void as though it never existed. Unlike a divorce, which dissolves a valid marriage, an annulment treats the marriage as if it were never legally binding from its inception. Annulments are granted under specific grounds when the legitimacy of the marriage is called into question. Laws governing annulment vary from one jurisdiction to another, but the concept of annulment remains consistent across legal systems.

Difference between Annulment, Divorce, and Legal Separation

  1. Annulment: As previously mentioned, an annulment declares a marriage null and void. This means that, legally, the marriage never existed. Annulments are granted when specific grounds can be proven, such as fraud, duress, or incapacity at marriage.
  2. Divorce: Divorce is the legal dissolution of a valid marriage. It terminates the marital union and resolves property division, child custody, and spousal support issues. Unlike annulment, divorce does not question the legitimacy of the marriage itself.
  3. Legal Separation: Legal separation is a court-ordered arrangement where a couple remains legally married but lives separately. This arrangement allows the couple to address financial and custodial matters without dissolving the marriage. A legal separation is an option for couples who wish to live apart without going through the finality of divorce.

Importance of Understanding the Annulment Process

Understanding the annulment process is essential for individuals who believe that their marriage may qualify for an annulment. Familiarity with the grounds, legal requirements, and consequences of annulment can help individuals make informed decisions and navigate the legal system more effectively. For example, under the Uniform Marriage and Divorce Act (UMDA), Section 208, an annulment may be granted if the marriage is found to be void or voidable. By understanding the applicable laws and procedures, individuals can determine whether an annulment is the right course of action for their circumstances. Moreover, consulting with a knowledgeable family law attorney can provide valuable guidance and support throughout the annulment process.

When Can You Get An Annulment ? General Grounds

To obtain a marriage annulment, one must demonstrate that the marriage is either void or voidable under the applicable laws. The grounds for annulment may vary by jurisdiction, but the following are generally recognized as valid reasons for annulment:

A. Bigamy

Bigamy occurs when one party is legally married to another person at the time of the subsequent marriage. Bigamous marriages are considered void from their inception. Under the Uniform Marriage and Divorce Act (UMDA), Section 208(a), a marriage is considered void if one party has a living spouse from a previous marriage.

B. Incest

Incestuous marriages involve individuals closely related by blood or marriage, as defined by state or federal law. Incestuous marriages are generally void and prohibited by law. For example, the UMDA, Section 208(b), declares that a marriage is void if the parties are related within the degrees of consanguinity prohibited by law.

C. Fraud or Misrepresentation

Fraud or misrepresentation occurs when one party enters the marriage based on false information or deceit by the other party. For a marriage to be voidable due to fraud, the misrepresentation must be substantial and directly related to the marital relationship. Examples include:

  • Concealing a criminal past.
  • Lying about financial status.
  • Hiding an existing pregnancy from a previous relationship.

D. Duress or Force

A marriage may be considered voidable if one party can prove that they were coerced or forced into the marriage. Duress or force must be significant enough to overcome the individual’s free will to enter the marriage voluntarily.

E. Mental Incapacity or Insanity

Suppose a party was mentally incapable of understanding the nature and consequences of the marriage or was legally insane at the time of the marriage. In that case, the marriage may be considered voidable. The mental incapacity must be severe enough that the individual could not have provided informed consent to enter the marriage.

F. Impotence or Inability to Consummate the Marriage

A marriage may be annulled if one spouse cannot engage in sexual intercourse and the other spouse was unaware of this fact before the marriage. The impotence or inability to consummate the marriage must be incurable and permanent for the marriage to be considered voidable.

G. Underage Marriage

If one or both parties were below the legal age for marriage at the time of the marriage, the marriage might be considered voidable. The legal age for marriage varies by jurisdiction, and some states may allow underage marriage with parental consent or a court order. Under the UMDA, Section 208(c), a marriage may be voidable if one or both parties were under the legal age for marriage and did not obtain the necessary consent or court order.

Legal Requirements for Marriage Annulment

A. Residency Requirements

Each jurisdiction has its residency requirements for filing an annulment petition. These requirements ensure the parties have a legitimate connection to the jurisdiction in which they seek an annulment. Typically, at least one party must have resided in the state or county for a specified period before filing the petition. For example, under the California Family Code, Section 2210, a petitioner must be a resident of California for at least six months and a resident of the county where the petition is filed for at least three months before filing for an annulment.

B. Statute of Limitations

The statute of limitations establishes the time frame a party can seek an annulment. The specific time limits may vary depending on the grounds for annulment and the jurisdiction. For instance, under the New York Domestic Relations Law, Section 140, a petitioner must seek annulment within five years from the discovery of fraud, three years from the discovery of an incurable physical incapacity, or two years from the discovery of a force or duress-induced marriage.

C. Filing the Petition

To initiate the annulment process, the petitioner must file a formal petition or complaint with the appropriate court. This document outlines the grounds for annulment, provides relevant factual information, and requests the court to annul the marriage. The petitioner must ensure that the petition complies with the rules and requirements of the jurisdiction in which the annulment is sought. Please adhere to these requirements to avoid the dismissal of the petition.

D. Providing Notice to the Spouse

After filing the annulment petition, the petitioner is required to serve notice upon their spouse, notifying them of the annulment proceedings. This process, known as the “service of process,” allows the other party the opportunity to respond to the allegations and participate in legal proceedings. The method of serving notice varies by jurisdiction and may include personal service, service by mail, or service through publication. It is crucial to comply with the jurisdiction’s service requirements to avoid delays or dismissal of the annulment case.

E. Gathering Evidence

To support the grounds for annulment, the petitioner must gather and present evidence that substantiates the claims made in the petition. This evidence may include documentation, witness testimony, or expert opinions. For example, in a fraud case, the petitioner may present emails, text messages, or financial records demonstrating the fraudulent misrepresentation. In a mental incapacity case, the petitioner may provide medical records or expert testimony from a mental health professional.

The Online Marriage Annulment Process

Step 1: Consultation with InstantOnlineDivorce.com

Before initiating the annulment process, it is crucial to consult with the experienced professionals at InstantOnlineDivorce.com. The consultation will help you determine whether your marriage qualifies for an online annulment, assess the merits of your case, and understand the legal requirements and procedures in your jurisdiction. This guidance will ensure that you are adequately prepared for the annulment process and help you avoid common pitfalls.

Step 2: Filing the Petition for Annulment

With the assistance of InstantOnlineDivorce.com, you will prepare and file the annulment petition online with the appropriate court in your jurisdiction. This document outlines the grounds for annulment, provides relevant factual information, and requests the court to annul the marriage. The professionals at InstantOnlineDivorce.com will ensure that your petition complies with the rules and requirements of your jurisdiction, increasing the likelihood of a successful outcome.

Step 3: Serving the Petition

Once your annulment petition is filed, you must serve notice upon your spouse, notifying them of the annulment proceedings. We will guide you through serving the petition, which may include personal service, service by mail, or service through publication, depending on the jurisdiction. Proper service is essential to avoid delays or dismissal of your annulment case.

Step 4: Response and Potential Negotiation

Upon receiving the petition, your spouse can respond to the allegations and participate in the legal proceedings. If your spouse contests the annulment or raises additional issues, such as property division or child custody, we can help you navigate the negotiation process to reach an amicable resolution.

Step 5: Court Hearings and Testimonies

If your case proceeds to court, we will assist you in preparing for the hearings, presenting your evidence, and providing testimony to support your annulment claim. The court will review the evidence, hear testimonies from both parties and determine whether the grounds for annulment have been met. InstantOnlineDivorce.com’s expertise will ensure you are well-prepared for this critical phase of the annulment process.

Step 6: Final Judgment and Decree of Annulment

Upon the conclusion of the court hearings, the judge will issue a final judgment and decree of annulment if the grounds for annulment have been established. This decree legally annuls your marriage, treating it as if it never existed. InstantOnlineDivorce.com will guide on the implications of the annulment decree, including property division, child custody, and support matters, and help you navigate any post-annulment issues that may arise.

Consequences of Annulling A Marriage

While declaring a marriage null and void, an annulment still has legal consequences that must be addressed. The following are some expected consequences that may arise from an annulment:

A. Division of Property

Upon the annulment of a marriage, the court may address the division of property acquired during the marriage. Depending on the jurisdiction, the property may be divided according to principles of equitable distribution or community property. It is essential to consult the laws in your jurisdiction to understand how property division will be handled. For example, under the California Family Code, Section 2251, a court may equitably divide property acquired during a void or voidable marriage as if the marriage had been validly dissolved.

B. Child Custody and Visitation

If the annulled marriage produced children, the court would need to determine child custody and visitation arrangements in the children’s best interests. The court will consider factors such as the parent’s ability to provide a stable environment, the children’s needs, and the parent’s willingness to cooperate in co-parenting. The Uniform Child Custody Jurisdiction and Enforcement Act (UCCJEA) may also come into play, governing jurisdictional issues in child custody matters.

C. Child Support

In cases involving children from the annulled marriage, the court may order one parent to pay child support to the other to ensure the children’s financial needs are met. Child support obligations are typically determined based on state-specific guidelines, which consider the parents’ income, the children’s needs, and the amount of time each parent spends with the children.

D. Spousal Support

Although annulments treat the marriage as if it never existed, some jurisdictions may still award spousal support, also known as alimony, in limited circumstances. The court may consider factors such as the duration of the marriage, the parties’ financial resources, and the parties’ ability to become self-supporting. For example, under the California Family Code, Section 2254, a court may award spousal support in a void or voidable marriage if the party seeking help is found to be a putative spouse, having entered the marriage in good faith.

E. Name Change

After an annulment, a party may wish to revert to their maiden or prior names. Depending on the jurisdiction, a name change may be incorporated into the annulment decree or may require a separate legal process. Consult a knowledgeable family law attorney to determine the procedures for a name change in your jurisdiction.

Create an online account

Simply register online, pay the small fee, gather your papers and ready to get an annulment.

Answer the questions

Answer each of the questions we will ask you and the marriage annulment forms will be completed for you.

Print & File the documents

File the Documents Print our state approved completed forms, and file the annulment forms in the court.

About Instant Online Divorce

Getting a marriage annulment does not need to be a headache. We have a guide that you can use to assist you through your annulment process online. In most cases, your forms can be completed in an hour or less. We only need you to answer some simple questions and we will use these questions to complete your annulment forms. You don’t have to go through the tedious process of hiring an attorney and therefore there is no waiting! The process is very simple and…you can download the forms online!

HOW WE CAN HELP YOU:

Online Divorce →
Marriage Annulment →
Legal Separation →
Uncontested Divorce →
Same Sex Divorce →
Cheap Divorce →
Divorce Papers →

  • What is the difference between an annulment and a divorce?

    The primary difference between an annulment and a divorce lies in their legal effect on a marriage. Both annulment and divorce dissolve a marriage, but they do so in distinct ways.

    An annulment treats the marriage as if it never legally existed. It declares the marriage null and void, retroactively invalidating it. Grounds for annulment typically involve circumstances that render a marriage void or voidable, such as fraud, bigamy, incest, duress, mental incapacity, or inability to consummate the marriage. An annulment erases the marriage, and in the eyes of the law, both parties return to their pre-marriage status.

    On the other hand, a divorce legally terminates a valid marriage. It recognizes that the marriage existed but has now been dissolved due to irreconcilable differences, fault grounds, or other reasons identified by the jurisdiction. Unlike an annulment, a divorce does not retroactively invalidate the marriage; it acknowledges the existence of the marriage and brings it to an end. Divorce proceedings often involve:

    • The division of marital property.
    • Determination of child custody and support.
    • Spousal support or alimony.

    To conclude, an annulment retroactively nullifies a marriage, treating it as if it never existed, while a divorce acknowledges the marriage’s existence and legally terminates it. The grounds and legal requirements for obtaining an annulment or a divorce may differ depending on the jurisdiction. It is essential to consult with a knowledgeable family law attorney to understand the options and implications in your specific case.

  • How is child custody determined in an annulment case?

    In an annulment case, child custody is determined by the court in the same manner as in a divorce or legal separation case. The primary consideration for the court when deciding child custody is the best interests of the child or children involved. Although an annulment treats the marriage as if it never legally existed, the court is still responsible for ensuring that appropriate custody and visitation arrangements are in place to safeguard the welfare of the children born during the marriage.

    When determining child custody in an annulment case, the court will consider various factors, including but not limited to the following:

    1. The emotional, physical, and mental well-being of the child;
    2. The ability of each parent to provide a stable, nurturing, and supportive environment;
    3. The child’s age, developmental needs, and any special requirements;
    4. The child’s preference, if the child is of an appropriate age and maturity to express a preference;
    5. The willingness and ability of each parent to facilitate and encourage a close and continuing relationship between the child and the other parent;
    6. The history of each parent’s involvement in the child’s life and any evidence of domestic violence, substance abuse, or neglect; and
    7. Any other factors the court deems relevant to the child’s best interests.

    In some cases, the court may appoint a guardian ad litem, a child custody evaluator, or other professionals to assist in determining the child’s best interests.

  • Does an annulment affect the legitimacy of children born during the marriage?

    The effect of an annulment on the legitimacy of children born during the marriage is an important consideration for many parents. While an annulment treats the marriage as if it never legally existed, the laws in most jurisdictions protect the legitimacy and rights of children born during the marriage, regardless of whether the marriage is ultimately annulled.

    In many jurisdictions, children born or conceived during a void or voidable marriage are considered legitimate for all legal purposes. This means that the rights and obligations of the parents concerning child custody, visitation, child support, and inheritance rights are not affected by the annulment. The legal principle underlying this approach is that children should not be penalized for the circumstances surrounding their parents’ marital status.

    For example, under the California Family Code, Section 2257, children born during a void or voidable marriage are considered legitimate, and their rights and interests are protected despite the annulment of the marriage.

    It is essential to consult the laws in your jurisdiction to understand how the legitimacy of children born during the marriage will be affected by an annulment. In most cases, the annulment will not negatively impact the children’s legal rights or their parents’ obligations towards them.

  • What happens to property acquired during the marriage after an annulment?

    The treatment of property acquired during the marriage after an annulment depends on the specific laws and circumstances of the jurisdiction in which the annulment is granted. As an annulment treats the marriage as if it never legally existed, the division of property acquired during the marriage can be more complex than in a divorce.

    In many jurisdictions, the court will still address the division of property acquired during the marriage upon the annulment. Depending on the jurisdiction, the property may be divided according to principles of equitable distribution or community property. Sometimes, the court may treat the property as if the parties were never married and apply separate property rules. The primary goal is to achieve a fair and just distribution of the property, considering the parties’ individual contributions and circumstances.

    For example, under the California Family Code, Section 2251, a court may equitably divide property acquired during a void or voidable marriage as if the marriage had been validly dissolved. This means that the court will generally attempt to divide the property fairly and equitably, considering factors such as the duration of the marriage, the parties contributions to the acquisition of the property, and the parties’ financial circumstances.

  • Can I revert to my maiden name after an annulment?

    The ability to revert to your maiden name or a prior name after an annulment depends on the specific laws and procedures of the jurisdiction in which the annulment is granted. Since an annulment treats the marriage as if it never legally existed, it is generally possible to revert to your maiden name or a prior name following an annulment. However, the process for doing so may vary depending on the jurisdiction.

    In some jurisdictions, a name change can be incorporated into the annulment decree, allowing you to revert to your maiden name or a prior name as part of the annulment process. In such cases, the court typically includes a provision in the annulment decree addressing the name change. You may use the decree as proof of the name change for legal and administrative purposes, such as updating your driver’s license or Social Security records.

    In other jurisdictions, a separate legal process may be required to revert to your maiden name or a prior name after an annulment. This process may involve filing a petition with the appropriate court, providing notice to interested parties, and obtaining a court order granting the name change. The specific requirements and procedures for obtaining a name change in your jurisdiction may vary. It is essential to consult with a knowledgeable family law attorney to ensure compliance with the applicable laws and procedures in your area.

    Re reverting to your maiden name or a prior name after an annulment may have additional legal and administrative implications, such as updating your identification documents, financial records, and property titles.

  • How does the annulment process work for same-sex marriages?

    The annulment process for same-sex marriages follows the same legal principles and procedures as for opposite-sex marriages. Since the landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision in Obergefell v. Hodges (2015), which recognized same-sex couples’ constitutional right to marriage, same-sex marriages are treated equally under the law in all U.S. jurisdictions. Consequently, the grounds for annulment, the legal requirements, and the process for obtaining an annulment for same-sex marriages are generally the same as for opposite-sex marriages.

    As with opposite-sex marriages, the specific grounds for annulment in same-sex marriages may include bigamy, incest, fraud or misrepresentation, duress or force, mental incapacity or insanity, impotence or inability to consummate the marriage, and underage marriage, among others. The legal requirements and procedures for obtaining an annulment, such as residency requirements, the statute of limitations, filing the petition, providing notice to the spouse, and gathering evidence, also apply to same-sex marriages in the same manner.

    The annulment process for same-sex marriages typically involves the following steps:

    1. Consultation with a knowledgeable family law attorney to discuss the grounds for annulment and the applicable legal requirements.
    2. Filing a petition for annulment with the appropriate court, citing the specific grounds for annulment, and providing relevant supporting evidence.
    3. Serving the petition on the other spouse, providing them with notice of the annulment proceedings and an opportunity to respond.
    4. Participating in court hearings, providing testimony and evidence to support the annulment grounds, and potentially engaging in negotiation or mediation to resolve disputes.
    5. Obtaining a final judgment and decree of annulment from the court nullifies the marriage and addresses related issues, such as property division, child custody, and spousal support.
  • Can my spouse contest an annulment?

    Yes, an annulment can be contested by your spouse. If your spouse disagrees with the grounds for annulment, disputes the facts presented in the annulment petition, or believes that the marriage should not be annulled, they may contest the annulment by filing a response with the court. In a contested annulment, both parties can present evidence and arguments supporting their respective positions. The court will ultimately decide whether or not to grant the annulment based on the evidence and legal arguments presented.

    In some cases, contested annulment proceedings may involve negotiation, mediation, or other alternative dispute resolution methods to resolve disagreements between the parties. It is essential to consult with a knowledgeable family law attorney to understand the implications of a contested annulment and to protect your interests throughout the process.

  • What are the costs associated with obtaining an annulment?

    Costs associated with obtaining an annulment:

    The costs associated with obtaining an annulment can vary depending on several factors, including the jurisdiction, the complexity of the case, and whether or not you choose to hire an attorney. Some common costs associated with annulment proceedings include:

    a. Court filing fees: Most jurisdictions require payment of a filing fee when submitting a petition for annulment. These fees can vary depending on the jurisdiction and may be subject to waiver or reduction for individuals with limited financial resources.

    b. Attorney’s fees: If you hire a family law attorney to represent you in your annulment proceedings, you will likely incur attorney’s fees. These fees can vary widely depending on factors such as the attorney’s experience, the complexity of your case, and the billing structure (e.g., hourly rate, flat fee, or retainer).

    c. Additional costs: In some cases, you may also incur additional costs related to the annulment process, such as fees for service of process, court-ordered evaluations or expert testimony, mediation, or other related expenses.

  • Do I need a lawyer to file for an annulment, or can I do it myself?

    While it is possible to file for an annulment without an attorney, also known as “pro se” or “self-representation,” navigating the legal process and understanding the relevant laws and procedures can be challenging. An experienced family law attorney can provide valuable guidance, ensure you meet all legal requirements, and advocate for your interests throughout the annulment process.

    However, if you choose to represent yourself, it is essential to familiarize yourself with the specific laws and procedures governing annulments in your jurisdiction and any forms and filing requirements. Some jurisdictions may offer self-help resources or legal clinics to assist individuals pursuing annulments without an attorney.

LATEST NEWS & TESTIMONIALS

I. Introduction The world has witnessed a significant shift towards digitalization in the past few…

Understanding Supervised Visitation Definition and purpose Supervised visitation is a court-ordered arrangement in which a…

A divorce can be a challenging and emotional process. For some couples, the complexities and…

Getting an annulment can be a complicated process, but it may be the best option…

Marriage is a commitment in which most people tie the knot without spending time and…

Divorce is a stress full and disappointing event in someone’s life. This issue becomes more…

Ashley Fletcher
Detailed and complete
         The form was quick and easy to fill out during a stressful time and made it feel a lot more comfortable for me to go through with    
Robert H. Schuller
This service is great and easy to use.
     This has been a very helpful process for a very stressful situation. Everything has been easy to complete, and the Live Chat is extremely helpful. Thank you!    
Roger Federer
Fast and Easy......Thank you.
     Is been great working with u guys, am looking forward to just download the forms n send it to the court house. I hope the questions I did not answer does not affect the process in any way. But in all is been awesomely great, thank u guys    
Edaline Lavender
IT WAS AN EASY WAY TO FILL OUT AL THE PAPER WORK.
     I was so relieved when I found this service online. I was so worried that I would not be able to afford a divorce or have the time to even commit to the entire paperwork process on my own. The process was really seamless. I highly recommend!    

Our Commitment To Our Customers

Divorce Papers

We offer you marriage annulment forms that are accurate and up to date. Our online marriage annulment process is quick and effective.

Approval Guarantee

100% Court approval guarantee. If your marriage annulment forms are not approved with the court we will refund your money.

Cost-Effective

Most cost-effective online marriage annulment solution for families that cannot afford an attorney.

Best Possible Solution

Best possible solution for people abroad or those in the military.

Want to apply for online marriage annulment from the comfort of your home?

We promise to give you top-notch service and you can get a marriage annulment without having to hire an attorney. We make the commitment to you and give you time to go on with your life the way you desire to live it.

Apply now

Process To File Online Marriage Annulment

Marriage annulment is never easy, but our step-by-step process can make it less stressful. Instant Online Divorce will prepare all the court-approved annulment forms you need to file for online marriage annulment. The first thing you need to do is qualify to use our service. You can do this by clicking Qualify Now on our home page.

Once qualified, you will answer a few basic questions to register and create your account. After you create your online account, you will begin our step-by-step online interview process. The online interview will give us all the answers we need to complete all the marriage annulment forms you need to file. Through our advanced technology, you can answer the questions at your own pace. All of your answers will save as you go.

After the online questionnaire is complete, we will prepare all of the marriage annulment forms you need to file. You will be able to download your forms from your online account or we can print and ship them to you. Upon receipt of your forms, you will need to sign them and file them with the local court.